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Review! This Book Stinks! by Sarah Wassner Flynn

23 Oct

This Book Stinks!: Gross Garbage, Rotten Rubbish, and the Science of Trash
By Sarah Wassner Flynn
128 pages – ages 9+
Published by National Geographic Children’s Books on March 28, 2017

Synopsis from Publisher- “Get up close and personal with a wonderful world of waste. From composting and recycling, to landfills and dumps, to how creative people are finding new ways to reuse rubbish. It’s fun to talk trash when it’s jam-packed with infographics, thematic spreads, wow-worthy photos, sidebars, serious stats, and fabulous facts. Also included are quizzes and activities to inspire kids to take action, be proactive, and rethink the things we throw away.”

What I Thought- This is a really neat nonfiction book from National Geographic. I particularly enjoy that Flynn puts together a conglomeration of fun facts, interviews, quizzes, and activities – the combination is perfect for keeping kids interested in the topic. The book is full of information that is important for kids to read, teaching them about why and how to recycle, reuse, and reduce our waste. As always, this National Geographic book is packed full of colorful layouts, fact boxes and short bursts of texts that keep their nonfiction books exciting and compelling to read.

Hopefully kids are inspired to help our planet and stop filling it up with trash. Another great nonfiction book from National Geographic!

I give this book five out of five bookworms!

Review! Hidden Dangers by Lola M. Schaefer

17 Oct

Hidden Dangers
Written by Lola M. Schaefer
Illustrated by Tymn Armstrong
40 pages – ages 6+
Published by Chronicle Books on August 8, 2017

Synopsis from Publisher- “These 13 deadly creatures can be difficult to spot until you’re right on top of them . . . or they’re right on top of you. Look for each animal in its environment—look closely!—and learn all the ways you could perish—or survive—depending on how smart, well-informed, and good at running away you are. From the deathstalker scorpion and the poison dart frog to wasps, alligators, and many more, young readers will gain a new appreciation for the animal kingdom, and the dangers it hides in plain sight!”

What I Thought- This is an awesome book – I love how it tells you how you can quickly get into bad situations…but also how you can survive it! The book has just the right amount of danger mixed with factual information to make this nonfiction book a thrilling read for the younger reader. Schaefer has created a wonderful guide to help kids realize they should always be on guard and informed in a situation they aren’t that familiar with. The text is very enlightening, telling the ways that the animals are dangerous, supporting why they are dangerous and then offering solutions in case of encounter with factual evidence and numbers. Armstrong’s art style is the perfect complement to the book – showing the animals in their natural habitats.

This can help kids identify where the animals would typically be seen when they may be in an area that contains a dangerous animal. I really enjoy how the book also includes a spread on things to bring for emergencies in the wild. What an awesome gift this would be for an outdoor loving kid! There is even a spread in the back about what you should take with you when exploring.

An all-around great book!

I give this book five out of five bookworms!

Review! 100 Things to Be When You Grow Up by Lisa M. Gerry

10 Jul

100 Things to Be When You Grow Up
By Lisa M. Gerry
256pages – ages 7+
Published by National Geographic Children’s Books on March 14, 2017

Synopsis from Publisher- “Who says adults can’t have fun? This book explores 100 of the coolest, wackiest, and most amazing jobs and careers out there, from astronaut to zookeeper, ice cream taster to game maker. ”

What I Thought- I really like the format of this book. It is a list, with one career per spread – except for when they include a longer interview with an expert in a field. That’s another thing I liked; the interviews with people who actually do the job – it’s a nice touch. The jobs are ones you may or may not have heard of, with things like a fire fighter to an adventure guide. Ms. Gerry presents the information in a fun way, and I love that she also includes tips for any career, made to get kids thinking about the future. I like the variety of jobs included, and that they included some odd ones that aren’t that hard to get. This was a nice nonfiction book to get kids thinking about their future, and I really hope that kids give it a look and find something to tickle their inspirations!

I give this book five out of five bookworms!

Blog Tour! TWO TRUTHS AND A LIE: IT’S ALIVE! By Ammi-Joan Paquette and Laurie A. Thompson

24 Jun


TWO TRUTHS AND A LIE: IT’S ALIVE!
By Ammi-Joan Paquette and Laurie A. Thompson
Illustrated by Lisa K. Weber
176 pages – ages 7+
Will be Published by Walden Pond Press on June 27, 2017

Synopsis from Publisher- “Did you know that there is a fungus that can control the mind of an ant and make it do its bidding? Would you believe there is such a thing as a corpse flower—a ten-foot-tall plant with a blossom that smells like a zombie? How about a species of octopus that doesn’t live in water but rather lurks in trees in the Pacific Northwest?
Every story in this book is strange and astounding. But not all of them are real. Just like the old game in this book’s title, two out of every three stories are completely true and one is an outright lie. Can you guess which? It’s not going to be easy. Some false stories are based on truth, and some of the true stories are just plain unbelievable. And they’re all accompanied by dozens of photos, maps, and illustrations. Amaze yourself and trick your friends as you sort out the fakes from the facts!”

What I Thought- This was a really cool book! I enjoyed trying to see which stories were false, and am proud to say that I got a few! It’s a really neat idea for kids, because they learn real facts too – as they try to discern what is false! There are also little activities (ie, observing nature, asking questions, etc.) for kids, as well as mini-challenges. The authors work well together, and you can tell they had fun with this project. Weber brightens the story with her fun cartoon illustrations throughout the stories. I really like what was done here with this book, and I hope to see more in this series!

I give this book five out of five bookworms!

Ammi-Joan Paquette has traveled to twenty-four countries, has the ability to wake herself up at a given time without an alarm clock, and once climbed Mt. Everest. (Not all of these are true!) Joan is the author of the novels Rules for Ghosting, Paradox, and Nowhere Girl, as well as the picture books Petey and Pru and the Hullabaloo, Ghost in the House, The Tiptoe Guide to Tracking Mermaids, and The Tiptoes Guide to Tracking Fairies. She lives outside Boston, Massachusetts, where she balances her own writing and her day job as a literary agent. You can visit her online at www.ajpaquette.com.

Laurie Ann Thompson has ridden a pig, gotten stuck in an elevator overnight, and jumped out of a perfectly good airplane. (One of these facts is not true; can you guess which?) She is the author of Be a Changemaker: How to Start Something That Matters, My Dog Is the Best, and Emmanuel’s Dream, a picture book biography about Emmanuel Ofosu Yeboah, which was the recipient of the Schneider Family Book Award and was named an ALA Notable Book, a CCBC Choice, and a Bank Street College Best Book of the Year, among dozens of other accolades. She lives outside Seattle with her family. You can visit her online at www.lauriethompson.com.

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Librarian’s Quest

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Flowering Minds

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Pragmatic Mom

Geo Librarian

13-Jun

Smack Dab in the Middle

14-Jun

Bluestocking Thinking

15-Jun

Novel Novice

Library Lions Roar

16-Jun

Archimedes Notebook

18-Jun

Nerdy Book Club

19-Jun

Cracking the Cover

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Writers Rumpus

The Hiding Spot

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Maria’s Melange

23-Jun

Unleashing Readers

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This Kid Reviews Books

Review! Motor Girls by Sue Macy

30 May

Motor Girls: How Women Took the Wheel and Drove Boldly Into the Twentieth Century
Written by Sue Macy, Foreword by Danica Patrick
96 pages – ages 9+
Published by National Geographic Children’s Books on February 7, 2017

Synopsis from Publisher- Come along for a joy ride in this enthralling tribute to the daring women – Motor Girls, as they were called at the turn of the century – who got behind the wheel of the first cars and paved the way for change. The automobile has always symbolized freedom, and in this book we meet the first generation of female motorists who drove cars for fun, profit, and to make a statement about the evolving role of women. From the advent of the auto in the 1890s to the 1920s when the breaking down of barriers for women was in full swing, readers will be delighted to see historical photos, art, and artifacts and to discover the many ways these progressive females influenced fashion, the economy, politics, and the world around them.

What I Thought- This was a fun nonfiction story about how the motor car evolved, and how women have played a part in its history. It was neat to see how women got involved, and how the industry reacted to that. There are plenty of real images from the time periods represented, and little news clippings from the time. It features girls and women who improved or changed the view on motor cars and women in general. The information in the book is given in an entertaining way that keeps the reader engaged.  The book gives the reader a great perspective that shows many of the things history books leave out. The book is well-organized, and takes you through the years of automobiles. The foreword by Danica Patrick is a great touch of a modern “Motor Girl.” I really enjoyed reading this nonfiction piece from National Geographic.

I give this book five out of five bookworms!

 

I especially appreciated this book because my little sister is a Motor Girl 😉 She races go karts and is very impressive at it! I gave the book to her after I read it. She enjoyed it also.

Josie out in front

Review! Double Cross: Deception Techniques in War by Paul B. Janeczko

26 Apr

Double Cross: Deception Techniques in War
by Paul B. Janeczko
256 pages – ages 9+
Published by Candlewick Press on April 25th, 2017 (TODAY!)

Synopsis From Publisher- “The biblical account of Gideon. The ancient story of the Trojan horse. Deceptive techniques have been used in war through the ages. But while the principles have changed very little, the technology behind fooling the enemy has evolved dramatically. Paul B. Janeczko’s fascinating chronology focuses on the American Civil War, World Wars I and II, and the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and the Gulf Wars to reveal evolving attitudes toward the use and effectiveness of deceptive operations. Find out the secret plan behind the invasion of Normandy and the details of General Schwarzkopf’s “Hail Mary play” during the Gulf War, among many other strategies and maneuvers designed to pull the wool over enemies’ eyes. Back matter includes source notes, a bibliography, and an index.”

What I Thought- This is a fabulous nonfiction book. Janeczko analyzes major techniques of deception throughout history, featuring medieval strategies and deceptions all the way up to the Gulf War. I learned a lot about military strategy, and the different types of deception. It was fascinating to learn about the deceptions pulled off during WWII, because those were some grand-scale deceptions! This was a very informative nonfiction novel, with real pictures and maps, and more information in the back as well. It is neat how the book takes in depth looks at major strategies, but still keeps the reading level and content for younger kids. He will spend a chapter or two on a war and major deceptions within them, making sure to explain the topics well. There are also pages of extra information scattered throughout the book that explains miscellaneous ideas about deception. Janeczko really knows how to make nonfiction intriguing, and I cannot wait to read more of his work!

I give this book five out of five bookworms!

Review! Bioengineering by Christine Burillo-Kirch

5 Oct

bioengineerBioengineering: Discover How Nature Inspires Human Designs

Series: Build It Yourself

Written by Christine Burillo-Kirch

Illustrated by Alexis Cornell

128 pages – ages 7+

Published by Nomad Press on August 9, 2016

Synopsis from Publisher- “In Bioengineering: Discover How Nature Inspires Human Designs, young readers explore designs and innovations that come from nature. Leonardo da Vinci studied birds’ wings to draw his design of a man-made flying machine and engineers still look to birds when attempting to make planes more aerodynamic. And a burr on your shirt from walking through a field sticks like Velcro, doesn’t it? The plant and animal world provides engineers and scientists with a host of ideas to apply to the human world to make it a better place to live.

Bioengineering explores different fields, including communication, transportation, and construction, and follows the process of engineering from the raw material of the natural world to the products we use in the human world every day. Activities such as building cantilevers and inventing a new fabric that mimics pinecone behavior require kids to think critically about their own needs and find creative ideas to fulfill those needs using designs from nature. Essential questions and links to digital and primary resources make this book an engaging and illuminating experience.”

What I Thought- This is a really neat nonfiction book. It explains the core concepts of bioengineering in terms that kids can understand. I really enjoyed how it simplified the theories, which I’m sure are actually quite complex, and also included projects to help the reader understand the topics even more. The projects are simple, and use everyday objects that would cost little to nothing to make. There are neat illustrations that help teach the topics and break up the text in an enjoyable way. This is a really nice introduction to bioengineering and its major ideas. The text is not overly complicated which is amazing because of the complex topics it is covering. This is a very well thought out and written book! The binding of the book reminds me of a school workbook, but the colorful illustrations, projects and engaging text makes it so much better than a textbook! Kids and teachers will like reading this book!

I give this book five out of five bookworms!fivebooks

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